Can Marijuana Seeds Prevent Pregnancy

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According to a recent study, reported on in Forbes magazine, the chemicals in marijuana may prevent pregnancy by making it difficult for a fertilized egg to implant in the uterus. Some recent studies suggest that marijuana can negatively affect fertility in both men and women. Read the article to learn about the correlation between marijuana and fertility to get informed about the latest findings. Find out if smoking marijuana will get in the way of getting pregnant

Marijuana As Birth Control?

According to a recent study, reported on in Forbes magazine, the chemicals in marijuana may prevent pregnancy by making it difficult for a fertilized egg to implant in the uterus.

Dey, the Dorothy Overall Wells professor of pediatrics, cell and developmental biology and pharmacology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, and his colleagues conducted their experiments in mice. It’s known that marijuana, the most widely used illegal drug among women of childbearing age, binds to two receptors, called cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2 (CB1 and 2). These receptors are found in the brain and also in sperm, eggs and newly formed embryos.

Typically, the two receptors are activated by a signaling molecule called anandamide, which is synthesized by an enzyme known as NAPE-PLD and then is degraded by another enzyme called FAAH. This balance, or “tone,” of the anandamide is crucial for the embryo to develop normally.

Dey and his team suppressed FAAH activity in the mice. This increased the level of anandamide, which mimics what happens when a woman smokes marijuana and increases the level of THC, which binds to the same receptor as anandamide. The results showed that when FAAH activity is suppressed in the embryos and oviduct, anandamide levels rise, preventing the embryos from completing their passage to the uterus and compromising the pregnancy.

“This is a major finding,” said Dey, “that if you block FAAH and disturb anandamide levels, there is a compromised pregnancy outcome.”

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In an accompanying commentary in the journal, Herbert Schuel, professor emeritus of anatomy and cell biology at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York, said the Dey study findings “show that exogenous THC can swamp endogenous anandamide signaling systems,” affecting many processes in the body.

And Schuel offered another warning: Several drugs in development to suppress appetite work by modifying anandamide signaling. Since many women of reproductive age take weight-loss drugs, he suggested that these drugs must be carefully evaluated to determine the long-term effects on women.

The point that the article didn’t touch on, and that interests me, is that these scientists have touched on a non-hormonal birth control. I wonder if this will be picked up on by a pharmaceutical company.

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this has already been studied a bit in research labs, and the ‘cure’ for hormonal birth control pills is still a long way away (if even possible through cannabinoid mediated mechanisms). From what I heard in a recent discussion, it’s not even close to 100% effective (and there’s no assurance that a cannabinoid based brith control would ever be fully efffective) and no one wants birth control that works 75% of the time. Maybe a few more years will find a way to make this a safer form of birth control. Also i’ve heard that smoking the ganja lowers sperm count, lowering the chance of pregnancy somewhat as well (though i’ve heard this just enough times to make me think it might be an urban legend, I’ll have to check later today).

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No no, they got it all wrong. It works as birth control for the following reason:
Him: Let’s do it! Nyahhhh! (stoner laugh)
Her: Alright. That’s cool.
pause
Him: What were we gonna do?
Her: I don’t know. Smoke some more hash?
Him: Nyahhhh. you said HASH. H-AAAAASH.
Her: My hands feel like birds. Hands are soooo cooollll.
both pass out

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Hmm. I wonder if the herb once used, and wiped out by, the Greeks (or was it Romans..) did that. Would love to see the reaction of the anti-choice movement to someone making a food supliment, unregulatable by the FDA, that just happened to work as a contraceptive as well. Assuming of course that other side effects didn’t arise.

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“Her: I don’t know. Smoke some more hash?”

who on the cosmic muffin’s green earth still uses the word HASH?

Aside from you Brandon, of course.

I don’t think that weed would kill sex drive at all.

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Haaaaash. Nyaaahhhahah.
Wait, why was I responding?

(j/k. I’ve heard say it plenty. Maybe it is a region specific preference, like soda, coke, pop, etc. hash is more surfer-ie. Weed is kinda high school or ghetto. Mary Jane is reserved for those over 40. Pot is a harsh word – too abrupt. Marijuana is what you call it in health class. A joint is a single object, as is a bowl, so wouldn’t work in the sentence. And my point wasn’t that it killed sex drive, just that they forgot they wanted to have sex. Grrr.. explained jokes never work. Bah humbug to you, sir!)

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Well I got it just fine. I think. my hands are birds. yesssss parrots. SQUAWK.

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Isn’t there some urban myth about weed decreasing sperm count? Killing two birds (or hands) with one stone (pun not intended, but definitely appreciated).

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Nyahahaaaa. you said stone.
.
.
Wait, what?

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There will be no discussion of killing birds on this here site. 🙂

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RPM, there was a 1978 paper, from Europe I think, that first kicked off this idea that smoking weed decreased sperm count (sperm density is a more accurate term). Lots of confounding variables that confuse the issue, and the subjects were called, “heavy users.” A group at SUNY Buffalo did, indeed, show in 1998 that physiologically-relevant THC interferes with fertilization via inhibiting acrosomal fusion with the egg – seems that endogenous anandamide is a positive modulator of sperm-egg fusion and THC can antagonize that positive effect.

However, even cigarette smoking can also lower sperm count. Moreover, THC is a potential steroid-mimetic in that it influences LH, testosterone, and prolactin levels; hence, heavy partakers of the blessed herb who are male can sometimes develop gynecomastia – haven’t yet heard of a similar effect in women, but must have been studied by pharma or academics because of potential blockbuster (pun intended) lifestyle drug formulation. Don’t know if a THC breast cream would be as dangerous as estrogen breast creams, the latter of which should never, ever, never, be used by young women due to a logical increased risk of breast cancer.

BTW, anandamide is intentionally taken from the Sanskrit word, ananada, meaning ‘bliss.’

But, enough, for now. I should be doing a proof on a certain young professor’s grant application! BTW, Shelleba, you make some really great observations and scientific assocaitions outside your primary field that would make you a valuable contributor in pharma. or if you want to start a dietary supplement company!

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Three Ways Marijuana Can Affect Fertility

Some studies show that marijuana use negatively affects fertility in men and women. Many articles and physicians advise against using marijuana while trying to get pregnant to reduce the risks of infertility. Learn more about the warnings signs of infertility and discover how you can develop healthy habits to increase your chances of getting pregnant.

Reviewed by

Anna Klepchukova, MD

1. Ovulation delay

Scientists aren’t sure exactly how THC affects the sexual function of women attempting to get pregnant. THC affects the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, which controls how your sex hormones interact. Continuous exposure to THC can inhibit the secretion of luteinizing hormone and prolactin from the pituitary gland in males and females. These hormones influence your chances of getting pregnant.

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In women, high THC doses interfere with the menstrual cycle and may delay or prevent ovulation. Cannabinoids inhibit the activity of the HPG axis, meaning that marijuana use decreases the production of several hormones and can inhibit sexual behavior — if your sex drive is down, this can also hinder your efforts to conceive.

Regular smokers may have an elevated risk of not ovulating at all. A 2016 report also suggests marijuana disrupts the menstrual cycle and can lead to anovulatory cycles (cycles without ovulation).

In general, it’s thought that marijuana can affect the production of luteinizing hormone in women. LH regulates testosterone production in men and stimulates female ovulation. When men smoke frequently, they tend to have lower levels of testosterone, and women who smoke frequently have less LH.

In addition to marijuana use, it’s important to examine other causes of late ovulation so you can put yourself in the best position for a successful pregnancy.

2. Lower sperm count

According to the Mayo Clinic, marijuana use can impair a man’s sperm count and ability to reproduce. Other research has suggested that marijuana is bad for men’s fertility.

However, a Harvard study surprisingly refutes those findings and states that there’s no evidence of harmful effects on fertility. In the study, researchers collected blood samples and semen from hundreds of volunteers at the Massachusetts General Hospital fertility clinic. In the study, which ran from 2000 to 2017, men were asked about their marijuana use. The results showed no correlation between marijuana use and male fertility.

Since there isn’t a conclusive determination on the subject, if you have a male partner who smokes, try to discourage him from doing so while you are trying to conceive — especially if his sperm count is low.

3. Deterioration of existing fertility problems

There’s no conclusive evidence that marijuana use causes infertility, but research has found that it can lower sperm count, increase anovulatory cycles, and disrupt the balance of hormones in the body that encourage pregnancy.

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Will using marijuana affect our chances of getting pregnant?

It may. Some studies have shown that using marijuana repeatedly is associated with significantly lower concentrations of reproductive hormones in both men and women.

Lower concentrations of the hormone testosterone may result in decreased sperm counts in men. And lower dehydroepiandrosterone may affect egg production in women.

In addition, THC (one of the active ingredients in pot) makes its way into the reproductive tract of women using marijuana and reduces sperm mobility, decreasing the chances of fertilization.

Perhaps the best reason to give up drugs now is that it’s not safe to use pot during pregnancy.

Some studies suggest that using marijuana regularly during pregnancy puts your baby at higher risk for premature birth and low birth weight. And because smoking weed (or tobacco) increases carbon monoxide levels in the bloodstream, the baby gets less oxygen, which may affect his growth.

Other studies show that children exposed to marijuana in their mothers’ wombs have different brain activity and more disturbed sleeping patterns as toddlers. They may also eventually suffer from depression or have behavior problems, such as impulsiveness and attention deficits. And some studies point to a link between prenatal marijuana exposure and lower school test scores.

Plus, it can be difficult to tell if the pot you’re getting is pure. It may be contaminated with other drugs or herbicides that could put your baby-to-be at even greater risk. Even legal dispensaries are not closely regulated, although some claim that their products have been approved or certified.

If you use pot, I suggest waiting a month or so after your last hit before trying to conceive since it takes that long to get all traces of the drug out of your system.

If you’re using marijuana for medicinal purposes, talk with your healthcare provider about your plans to become pregnant. She may be able to suggest a safer alternative.

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Burkman LJ, et al. 2003. Marijuana impacts sperm function both in vivo and in vitro: Semen analyses from men smoking marijuana. Fertility and Sterility 80(3):231. http://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282%2803%2901534-6/fulltext [Accessed June 2016]

Fried PA, et al. 2003. Differential effects on cognitive functioning in 13- to 16-year-olds prenatally exposed to cigarettes and marihuana. Neurotoxicology and Teratology 25(4):427-36.

Goldschmidt L, et al. 2008. Prenatal marijuana exposure and intelligence test performance at age 6. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolesceny Psychiatry 47(3):254-63. [Accessed June 2016]

Goldschmidt L, et al. 2004. Prenatal marijuana and alcohol exposure and academic achievement at age 10. Neurotoxicology and Teratology 26(4):521–32. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15203174 [Accessed June 2016]

Goldschmidt L, et al. 2000. Effects of prenatal marijuana exposure on child behavior problems at age 10. Neurotoxicology and Teratology 22(3):325-36.

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